Tag Archives: No Child Left Behind (NCLB)

House Majority Leader McCarthy Pulls Out of House Speaker Race

House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) announced today that he is pulling out of the race to succeed retiring House Speaker John Boehner (R-OH). McCarthy made his surprise announcement at the start of a Republican meeting convened to choose the party’s nominee.

In the wake of McCarthy’s surprise announcement, a Republican vote to nominate a new speaker that was scheduled for Thursday afternoon was postponed by Boehner at McCarthy’s suggestion. The full House was scheduled to vote for speaker Oct. 29. Boehner said in a statement he will stay on as speaker until a new one is elected.

Wisconsin’s Paul Ryan said in a statement that Republicans need to “take time to deliberate and seek new candidates for the speakership.” Continue reading House Majority Leader McCarthy Pulls Out of House Speaker Race

Gov. Walker Talks K-12 Education on the Campaign Trail in New Hampshire

From WisPolitics.com

Governor Walker, speaking during the New Hampshire Education Summit, told host and journalist Campbell Brown his focus as president would be to shift the power and money for education from Washington to the states. His health care rhetoric in recent days hit a similar anti-Washington note.

Moving control of education from the federal government, he said, would “empower the states to go out and be innovators.” He did not say specifically how he would he would make those changes if elected president. “Making that sort of move is going to take a fair amount of conversation,” he said.

And if that conversation means challenging his own party, if necessary, on topics such as No Child Left Behind, then OK. The governor said he “appreciates the intent behind it,” but considers NCLB another education barrier preventing states from taking control. “The best of intentions,” Walker said, “always build into something else out there.” Continue reading Gov. Walker Talks K-12 Education on the Campaign Trail in New Hampshire

Wisconsin’s No Child Left Behind Waiver Renewed

The U.S. Department of Education (USED) just approved renewals of state flexibility from the mandates of the federal Elementary and Secondary Education Act, also known as No Child Left Behind Act, for Wisconsin and six other states: Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Connecticut, Mississippi, and New Hampshire.

Wisconsin received a three-year renewal of its waiver through the 2017-18 school year, meaning it won’t have to make another ask during President Barack Obama’s tenure (if waivers even last that long). And it’s unclear what the federal accountability picture will look like by that time as a rewrite of the No Child Left Behind Act is currently making its way through Congress.  Continue reading Wisconsin’s No Child Left Behind Waiver Renewed

House Education Committee Chairman John Kline to Chair Conference Committee on Federal ESEA Rewrite

Leaders of the Congressional committees that deal with education issues met late last week to lay the groundwork on how to proceed with a conference committee to resolve differences in the House- and Senate-passed bills to overhaul the current version of the federal Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), commonly referred to as the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB).

House Education and the Workforce Committee Chairman John Kline (R-MN), Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee Chairman Lamar Alexander (R-TN), Senate Ranking Member Patty Murray (D-WA), and House Ranking Member Bobby Scott (D-VA) took part in the discussions. Continue reading House Education Committee Chairman John Kline to Chair Conference Committee on Federal ESEA Rewrite

Compromise Needed Between U.S. Senate and U.S. House to Get Rewrite of No Child Left Behind Education Law to President’s Desk

Senate approval of a bill to rewrite the landmark federal No Child Left Behind law means a Conference Committee will be convened to reconcile differences between the Senate’s version and a separate version passed by the U.S. House. It also sets the stage for what could be contentious negotiations over the federal government’s role in education policy.

Last week’s 81-17 bipartisan Senate vote in favor of passage came one week after the House passed its own rewrite with only Republicans voting in favor.  Here’s a look at the similarities and differences between the two versions: Continue reading Compromise Needed Between U.S. Senate and U.S. House to Get Rewrite of No Child Left Behind Education Law to President’s Desk

ESEA Modernization Bill Passes the U.S. Senate

From the National School Boards Association (NSBA):

History has been made this afternoon as the U.S. Senate successfully voted on and passed S. 1177, the bipartisan Every Child Achieves Act, to reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA).  S. 1177 just passed by a roll call vote of 81-17.  NSBA outlined its top priorities in a July 6 letter to the Senate, 1) reaffirming local-level decision making in public education and 2) opposing any proposals supporting vouchers or tuition tax credits to non-public schools.  NSBA accomplished both of these priorities and applauds the continued momentum on ESEA re-authorization.  Thank you for responding to our call to action today to urge final passage of S. 1177. Continue reading ESEA Modernization Bill Passes the U.S. Senate

U.S. House Narrowly Passes ESEA Rewrite; U.S. Senate Debate Over ESEA Continues

The U.S. House of Representatives passed its version of a bill to reauthorize the federal Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) yesterday evening (July 8) by a close vote of 218 to 213.

The House bill—H. R. 5, the “Student Success Act”—would streamline federal education programs and includes language that would allow Title I dollars to follow students to public schools of their choice — a deal-breaker for House Democrats. Indeed, the margin in favor of passage came entirely from Republican votes. All House Democrats and 27 House Republicans voted against the bill. Continue reading U.S. House Narrowly Passes ESEA Rewrite; U.S. Senate Debate Over ESEA Continues